Buckley, Philip
Phillip Buckley was a Native from Ireland, who had been employed in Mr. Waddington’s road crew that had been attacked in the Bute Inlet conflict.1 Buckley was one of three survivors but suffered from extensive stab wounds resulting from the attack.
On 30 April 1863, just before daybreak, men of the Tsilhqot’in First Nations began their attack on Mr. Waddington’s road crew.2 Mr. Buckley awoke to two men entering his tent, he then received a blow by the butt end of a musket to his head.3 Buckley jumped out of his tent where he was met by two other Tsilhqot’in men and received several stab wounds from long knives, four in total, one to each loin, and a severe wound to his wrist.4 He had collapsed and dragged himself into the bush where he remained for several hours and fainted due to loss of blood.5 He dragged himself about 150 feet towards the Homathko River and regained strength from the water.6 Buckley then started up the river towards Mr. Brewster's camp for help.7 Just before arrival, he noticed several dogs barking and fires burning, knowing Brewster did not have any dogs in his party, Buckley thus concluded Brewster's party had also fallen victim to a Tsilhqot’in attack.8 Buckley then made his way, along the river towards the ferry, along the way never running into any other member of Mr. Waddington’s crew.9 Upon arrival at the ferry he met with Edward Moseley and Peter Peterson who were other survivors of the Bute Inlet conflict.10 The three of them travelled to Nanaimo and then boarded the Emily Harris to Victoria. Peterson and Buckley were then admitted to the Royal Hospital where they received medical attention for non-threatening wounds.11
At the trial against Teloot, Klatsassin, Tappit, Kiddaki, Piere, Tansaki and Tatchasia, for the attack on the road crew, Buckley was successful in identifying these men in the attack.12 Buckley stated that Teloot was the man that originally attacked him with the musket, and claimed that many of these men had been previously employed by Mr. Waddington in the road project.13 Buckley also mentioned that these men had been camping near the road crew, two to three nights previous to the attack and showed no hostility.14
  • 1. Dreadful Massacre, Daily British Colonist, 12 May 1864.
  • 2. BCA, "Begbie to the Governor of British Columbia Including Notes Taken by the Court at the Trial of 6 Indians" GR-1372, F142f/16, Mflm B1308
  • 3. Ibid.
  • 4. Dreadful Massacre, Daily British Colonist, 12 May 1864.
  • 5. Seymour to Newcastle, 20 May 1864, 6959, CO 60/18, 273.
  • 6. Dreadful Massacre, Daily British Colonist, 12 May 1864.
  • 7. Ibid.
  • 8. A survivor's Account, Daily Chronicle, 12 May 1864.
  • 9. BCA, "Begbie to the Governor of British Columbia Including Notes Taken by the Court at the Trial of 6 Indians" GR-1372, F142f/16, Mflm B1308
  • 10. Dreadful Massacre, Daily British Colonist, 12 May 1864.
  • 11. A survivor's Account, Daily Chronicle, 12 May 1864.
  • 12. BCA, "Begbie to the Governor of British Columbia Including Notes Taken by the Court at the Trial of 6 Indians" GR-1372, F142f/16, Mflm B1308
  • 13. Ibid.
  • 14. Ibid.
Biographical information is not yet available for this person.
Mentions of this person in the documents
The Colonial Despatches Team. Buckley, Philip. The Colonial Despatches of Vancouver Island and British Columbia 1846-1871, Edition 2.2, ed. The Colonial Despatches Team. Victoria, B.C.: University of Victoria. https://bcgenesis.uvic.ca/buckley.html.

Last modified: 2020-12-02 13:40:34 -0800 (Wed, 02 Dec 2020) (SVN revision: 5008)