No. 33
7th December 1857
Sir
1. I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch No 12 of the 16th of July last, transmitting copy of a letter from the Foreign Office, relative to the repayment of the sum of money advanced by me to Governor Stevens for the prosecution of hostilities against the Indians of Washington Territory.
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2. I feel greatly obliged for the trouble you have so kindly taken in pressing the United States Government for the immediate re-payment of that loan, though I observe with regret that the money has not been as yet repaid, and by Lord Napier's correspondence, it further appears that Governor Stevens had not, up to the date of Mr Drinkard's letter reported the transaction to the War Department.
3. That omission may have arisen from accident or oversight on his part; but in a matter of so much importance, involving the honor of the Government represented there ought to have been no omission, so seriously compromising my interests, as I had certainly a right to expect both the early repayment of theloanManuscript image loan made, and the thanks of the Government whose distress had been so seasonably relieved.
4. I transmit herewith a copy of my correspondence with Governor Stevens on the subject of that loan, which will make known the distressing circumstances as respresented in the letter of Governor Stevens and his Agents, under which I was induced to make that advance when no other aid could be obtained.
5. Governor Stevens having been removed from Office, has left this country or I should have addressed him on this occasion.
6. I again appeal to your aid and protection in that matter which I leave entirely in your hands.
I have the honor to be Sir
Your most obedient humble Servant
James Douglas
Governor

The Right Honble Henry Labouchere Esqre
Her Majesty's principal Secretary of State
For the Colonial Department.
Minutes by CO staff
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Mr Merivale
Copy to F. Office requesting Lord Clarendon to take such steps as may appear proper to his Lordship for procuring reimbursement. And acquaint the Govr.
ABd 16 F
It is nearly two years since Governor Douglas made this advance out of his own private funds. I must say such delay is not very encouraging to English officers who may be inclined to help the US Governmt in pecuniary scrapes. It might be as well to speak privately to the F. office about this case, & ensure its being attended to.
HM F 17
CF 18
Other documents included in the file
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Draft, Merivale to E. Hammond, Foreign Office, 25 February 1858, forwarding copy of the despatch and enclosures and asking that the necessary steps be taken to obtain a return of the funds.
Minutes by CO staff
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Mr Merivale
Will you, or shall I speak to Mr Hammond on this subject.
Mr Blackwood
For signature: & I annex a short private note to Mr Hammond.
Other documents included in the file
*
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Draft reply, Stanley to Douglas, No. 5, 15 March 1858.
Documents enclosed with the main document (not transcribed)
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1. Isaac I. Stevens to Douglas, 7 February 1856, asking him to furnish supplies of "powder, lead, sugar, coffee, pork, clothing, candles, soap, tea" for the volunteer troops as required by Commissary and Quartermaster R.S. Robinson.
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2. Stevens to Douglas, 29 February 1856, advising he would be dispatching a confidential measure to Victoria in a day or two to purchase, on the faith of the U.S. government, between $10-15,000 of "Indian Goods for distribution among the friendly Indians."
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3. R.S. Robinson, Commissary and Quartermaster, Washington Territory, to Douglas, 1 March 1856, urgently requesting supplies for the immediate use of the volunteer forces now in the field against "hostile Indians."
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4. Douglas to Stevens, 6 March 1856, stating that the Hudson's Bay Company and other merchants were unwilling to furnish supplies for scrip, and suggesting he and recommending he draw bills of exchange on the United States treasury for the supplies required.
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5. Douglas to Stevens, 7 March 1856, advising that he had purchased some "sugar, coffee, and the Number of Blankets wanted, with a supply of Gunpowder and Lead, out of my own private funds, . . . with a view of meeting your pressing necessities, leaving the payment for your settlement, in any manner, that will secure me from loss."
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6. Stevens to Douglas, March 1856, advising more goods were needed, and that, as to payment, "we expect appropriations to be made by Congress at its present session."
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7. Stevens to Douglas, 9 March 1856, explaining that scrip was not territorial by nature but issued upon the authority of the highest federal officer, and that by law he could only draw upon the U.S. Treasury for sums already appropriated by Congress, whereas emergency expenditures by crip would be paid from subsequent appropriations from Congress, even should the officer issuing the scrip be removed for failing to show just cause for the emergency.
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8. Robinson to Douglas, 2 May 1856, advising that Stevens had furnished him with sufficient scrip to pay for the supplies previously furnished and that "events have transpired in Washington City, evidencing certainty of appropriations being made the present session of Congress."
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9. Robinson to Douglas, no date, asking for further supplies and reiterating his conviction that the necessary appropriations would soon be granted by Congress.
Douglas, James to Labouchere, Henry 7 December 1857, CO 305:8, no. 1621, 257. The Colonial Despatches of Vancouver Island and British Columbia 1846-1871, Edition 2.2, ed. James Hendrickson and the Colonial Despatches project. Victoria, B.C.: University of Victoria. https://bcgenesis.uvic.ca/V57033.html.

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